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ryanpanos:

Tower of David: the World’s Tallest Slum | Via

The Tower of David is an abandoned unfinished skyscraper in the center of Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela, that is now home to more than 3,000 squatters, who have turned the 45-story skyscraper into the world’s tallest slum.

Construction of the building, originally called “Centro Financiero Confinanzas” and nicknamed the “Tower of David”, after its developer, David Brillembourg, was started in 1990 and was to become a symbol of Caracas’ bright financial future. It is the third highest skyscraper in the country. But a banking crisis brought those plans to an abrupt halt in 1994. The government took control over the building and construction was never completed. The building has no elevators, no installed electricity or running water, no balcony railing and windows and even walls in many places.

In 2007, a group of squatters took over the building, and it quickly gained notoriety as a hotbed of crime and drugs. Despite this, residents have managed to build a comfortable and self sustaining community complete with basic utility services such as electricity and water that reaches all the way up to the 22nd floor. Lifts being absent, residents can use motorcycles to travel up and down the first 10 floors, but must use the stairs for the remaining levels.  Inside the building’s long hallways there are warehouses, clothing stores, beauty parlours, a dentist and day-care centers. Some residents even have cars, parked inside of the building’s parking garage. Some seven hundred families comprising over 3,000 residents live in the tower today.

(via thisbigcity)

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futuramb:


10 Companies That Control Almost Everything We Eat Hayley Peterson, businessinsider.com
The graph­ic focus­es on 10 of the world’s most pow­er­ful food and bev­er­age com­pa­nies: Coca-Cola, Pep­si­Co, Unilever, Danone, Mars, Mon­delez Inter­na­tion­al, Kel­logg’s, Gen­er­al Mills, Nes­tle, and Asso­ci­at­ed British Foods.
Oxfam ca…

This is an interesting image visualizing the direction some key supply structures for humanity are moving in. There are of course a number of questions around the future of food and nourishment connected to these kinds of structures e g around future availability and pricing, future quality and nutritional value and future power relations.

futuramb:

10 Companies That Control Almost Everything We Eat
Hayley Peterson, businessinsider.com

The graph­ic focus­es on 10 of the world’s most pow­er­ful food and bev­er­age com­pa­nies: Coca-Cola, Pep­si­Co, Unilever, Danone, Mars, Mon­delez Inter­na­tion­al, Kel­logg’s, Gen­er­al Mills, Nes­tle, and Asso­ci­at­ed British Foods.

Oxfam ca…

This is an interesting image visualizing the direction some key supply structures for humanity are moving in. There are of course a number of questions around the future of food and nourishment connected to these kinds of structures e g around future availability and pricing, future quality and nutritional value and future power relations.

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cross-connect:

Portuguese urban artist Alexandre Farto aka Vhils born 1987creates stunning murals from decomposing walls using chisels, drills and small explosives. Seeing the act of deconstruction as a creative process, his deconstructed portraits can be found in Shanghai, London, Bogota, Paris, Lisbon and Los Angeles to name a few. 

Going by the name of VHILS, his work has obtained plenty of interest when a face carved into a wall appeared alongside a picture by street artist Banksy in London in 2008. His work is a renovation of our urban environment. Equally as important as art, it must exist not only in our galleries but out in the environment as well. By manipulating a variety of surfaces, VHILS envisions rich and layered portraits on our buildings that not only show us a visual portrait but also a picture of time in the city. Part artist, stone mason and archeologist, he slowly excavates the process of his craft via 

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fastcompany:

"People can copy your model but they can’t necessarily copy your brand. A brand is a point of view and a world you create." - Warby Parker’s Neil Blumenthal on Focus